Hard Drive Failure Rates On Rise

  • The first hard drive reliability report was released by Backblaze in January of this year, revealing that Hitachi and Seagate drives are the most and least reliable respectively. Since then, the team at Backblaze has been testing more and more drives, updating their reliability report for September 2014. Read more over @ techspot.
  • Avoid Tech Support Phone Scams

    Cybercriminals don’t just send fraudulent email messages and set up fake websites. They might also call you on the telephone and claim to be from Microsoft. They might offer to help solve your computer problems or sell you a software license. Once they have access to your computer, they can do the following:

    1. Trick you into installing malicious software that could capture sensitive data, such as online banking user names and passwords. They might also then charge you to remove this software.
    2. Convince you to visit legitimate websites (like www.ammyy.com) to download software that will allow them to take control of your computer remotely and adjust settings to leave your computer vulnerable.
    3. Request credit card information so they can bill you for phony services.
    4. Direct you to fraudulent websites and ask you to enter credit card and other personal or financial information there.

    Neither Microsoft nor their partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes.

    You can fight back against these criminals by reporting phone scams.

    You can read more by going to Microsoft.com’s full page on this issue.

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    Millions Hit By Computer Virus

    The internet was under attack last night by the fastest-growing computer virus in history.
    Worldwide systems were buckling after the ‘Sobig.F’ spread to 134 countries in just 96 hours, generating tens of millions of e-mails.
    Experts fear it could increase the volume of electronic traffic by a staggering 60per cent, slowing the internet to a crawl.
    It is believed to have cost British businesses alone hundreds of millions in lost orders and system crashes. The global cost will be immense.
    Individual companies have been bombarded with millions of copies of the virus, while home users have seen their machines “jammed” by up to 6,000.
    The PC World chain said tens of thousands of customers had brought in computers to be “cleaned” by technicians.
    Experts say Sobig appears to have been written by senders of “spam” – unwanted junk e-mail – trying to find ways past internet filters which block their messages.
    The new digital onslaught comes hard on the heels of two other major viruses, Blaster and Nachi. “This is the worst barrage of viruses in the history of computing,” said Graham Cluley of Sophos Anti-Virus.

    Read more: DailyMail

    The Best Free Antivirus for 2014

    Going without antivirus protection isn’t an option. Even if you don’t care about your own computer, leaving it unprotected could let cyber-crooks turn it into a zombie minion and force it to participate in DDoS attacks. If you have any computers without an antivirus, you need to install protection. Right now. Don’t worry; it won’t cost you a penny. We here at All About Computers, Inc recommned you use Avast! Free Antivirus. You can download it from our downloads page.
    Read More @ PC MAG

    Microsoft disrupts ZeroAccess botnet

    The Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit today announced it has successfully disrupted a rampant botnet in collaboration with Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and leaders in the technology industry, including A10 Networks Inc. The Sirefef botnet, also known as ZeroAccess, is responsible for infecting more than 2 million computers, specifically targeting search results on Google, Bing and Yahoo search engines, and is estimated to cost online advertisers $2.7 million each month. Today’s action is expected to significantly disrupt the botnet’s operation, increasing the cost and risk for cybercriminals to continue doing business and preventing victims’ computers from committing fraudulent schemes. Read more @ microsoft.com